What is the difference between oregon and thyme?



Answer:
Oregon is a state north of California! Ok, seriously, oregano and thyme differ in flavor and intensity. Fresh oregano have a unique and distinctive flavor that you find surrounded by Italian and Greek cooking. Its more acrid in some respects. Thyme is smoother and you'll find it within stews, both beef and chicken dishes, some sauces and so on. It has smaller leaves.
one is a state and the other is an herb.

(oregano is the correct name)
Oregon is a state contained by the Northwestern corner of the United States. They don't grow much Oregano there, Thyme is a type of Herb used within cooking. There are many variety of Thyme which bring different subtleties of flavor. Below are links to the wiki descriptions of both of the herbs you are curious roughly speaking. Once you master their uses come on out to Oregon and cook for me!
Oregano? Is more sweet!
oregano and thyme are 2 different herbs. here flavors are different and so the way they produce food taste will change. they make great compliments to dishes and affix great flavors. just be assistance ful because you wouldnt want these herbs to over power your foods. at hand is a big difference in whether you catch these herbs dried or fresh. dried herb are stronger in flavor next fresh so u will need smaller quantity in your foods.
one is an american state and the other is an herb?

really though .oregano has a slightly licorice smell and works very well with italian foods and veggie dishes esp.if it contains a tomatoe product. within some regions of the united states it,s used within chili and other mexican recipes.
thyme is a wonderful herb beside a crisp dusty smell i liken it to sage but maybe because they mix so powerfully ,and adds awesome flavor to chicken dishes hot or cold.it,s one of my favorite herb and i use both dry and fresh. in soups, stews, baked chickens, stuffings rice dishes,pork.
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