Expiration date for garlic?

I have have garlic cloves in my refrigerator for over a month surrounded by a zip lock purse...they seem fine but is in attendance a expiraction date for garlic?

Answer:
There is no set expiration date.

If the garlic sprouts, I just prepare off the white section of the garlic for cooking and throw away the sprout.

If the white part of the garlic have changed colors and you see brown spots or is mushy, then simply throw it all out.
they expire when they start to sprout new growth up til them they are fine to use
i don't think so. if it dries out, next it is no longer good
usually a year
The biggest article to check for is firmness. If they are firm, you can cook with them. Plan on using for a time more, as they likely won't be at full pungent strength.

If they are sprouting, that is to say indeed a sign that they are regrowing (you might want to peel and plant one for fun!). I abhor to admit this, but contained by a pinch I have used cloves that only just started to sprout. I just cut around and tossed out the green module.

What you want to avoid is when they are soft/mushy or really pitted and discolored. That's when they aren't usuable. Otherwise you are safe to progress for it...it just won't be top standard, so depending on what you are making you might want to suppliment with a moment or two garlic powder to enhance the flavor. Plus be sure to smash the gloves (cut or not) to get as much liquid out as possible, as they will be drying out if old, and you want to lend a hand get out as much of the correct garlic flavor as you can.

From what you said, sounds usuable to me...a month really isn't that long for garlic esp if it was fresh when you get it.

Good luck!

ETA: I actually thought of you yesterday. Martha Stewart have on one of the world's top French Chefs and they were making a spring lamb stew. In his showing how to cut unseal the garlic he spoke of removing the middle part (forget what he call it, but his very gelatinous French accent made him not easy to understand words I know lol). Then Martha even chimed in, "especially if it's green." So if she say it's ok to use if green, long as you remove it, who am I to argue. Funny the Chef, who owned Lutece, said that middle part is what make garlic bitter, so now I will rate more attention next time I chop garlic! But have to share this, since I would assume those 2 know what's good and what's not. She may be prissy, but she know her stuff lolol! And glad to see I gave the correct info, only going by how I cook.
Hi !
Here is what I found...

Garlic, chopped, commercial jar 18 months Refrigerate; use
by date on jar.

------AND, FURTHER ON THE WEBSITE BELOW, ITS SAYS...

Garlic:

2 days (On the shelf)
1-2 weeks (In the refrigerator)
1 month (In the freezer)
Garlic still within the glove will most likely still be OK because of the skin's protection (unless it have visibly molded or gone soft).

However, peeled garlic cloves tend to sour fairly quickly. There is no set date of expiration b/c this adjectives depends on the humidity, temperature, and age of the garlic when it be refrigerated. The best channel to tell is to distribute it a smell. If you get an sour tinge in the odor it is time to toss the garlic. Obviously mold and softness are also signs the garlic requirements to make its exit.

Fair requirement, even if the garlic hasn't soured, cloves tend to heavily increase in intensity over time (as do adjectives members of the onion clan...try cutting an onion you hold had sitting on your counter for 3 weeks if you don't believe me. Your housemates will presume your dog has died). You might go to cut the amount you use by 1/3 if you have have the cloves for more than 2 weeks or so.
When it sprouts it become a little bitter. I own planted sprouting garlic and it grows just fine. Planting garlic around your house is supposed to protect you from evil spirits. Hee hee.

You can also snip the sprouts and use them resembling chives, a little strong and hot but not discouraging.

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